holocene
let's just say I breathe
holocene
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apsies:

King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”
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silhouettesandfiguresstay:

Me during my midlife crisis probably.
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"Remind yourself that you don’t have to do what everyone else is doing."
(via sixsteen)
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starklady:

probably my fav game of thrones cap ever
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"Sometimes I can hear my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I’m not living."
Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (via wordsnquotes)
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"I hope that one day you will have the experience of doing something you do not understand for someone you love."
Jonathan Safran Foer (Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close)
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 Al Pacino photographed by Steve Wood, 1974.
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 Jimi Hendrix photograpged by Jim Marshall, at the Winterland Ballroom, 1968.

 Jimi Hendrix photograpged by Jim Marshall, at the Winterland Ballroom, 1968.

 Jimi Hendrix photograpged by Jim Marshall, at the Winterland Ballroom, 1968.
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rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.
 
rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.
 
rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.
 
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"Io avevo voglia di stare da solo, perché soltanto solo, sperduto, muto, a piedi, riesco a riconoscere le cose."
Pier Paolo Pasolini, L’odore dell’India (via doppisensi)